Saturday, March 14, 2020

Jefferesonian republicans DBQ #4 essays

Jefferesonian republicans DBQ #4 essays The Jeffersonian Republicans are usually characterized as strict constructionists who were opposed to the broad constructionism of the Federalists. This is true only to an extent. Jefferson would change his outlook on being a strict or loose constructionist depending on the situation at hand. Jefferson would be a loose or strict constructionist depending on which way would more benefit there way of reason and thinking. There is no fine line between being definite strict and loose constructionists in Jeffersons case but more of a broadened idea. Madison was more of a strict constructionists, as he really stuck to exactly what powers were given by the Constitution. Reasons as the National Bank, Louisiana Purchase, Hartford Convention, Improvements Bill, and the Embargo Act of 1807, will show how each party morphs, and changes to become a strict constructionist and a loose constructionist, and how Madison stays a strict constructionists by the Hartford Convention, and Improvements Bill. The National Bank, a time when Jefferson and the anti-federalists were strict constructionists. Saying that the idea of a national bank was unconstitutional, not stated in the constitution, and there for cannot be ratified. Strict constructionists being people who say you have to directly abide by the constitution, and if its not stated, it doesnt happen. Hamilton, as would Madison at this time say a national bank is necessary and proper, and under the Elastic clause, therefore making it constitutional. These would be ideas of the loose constructionists. People who think its ok to stretch the constitution and form, and mold it are loose constructionists. At this moment in time, Jefferson is a strict constructionist, saying you must abide directly by the constitution, although according to his needs and wants at this time, being from the south and not wanting more power to the federal government, but ...

Wednesday, February 26, 2020

Reflection Memo Personal Statement Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

Reflection Memo - Personal Statement Example Such a degree of usefulness has left internet usage among children and young people open to various abuses and problematic scenarios. That is because the digital world that comprises the internet remains largely unsupervised by parents and teachers. Thus exposing children to certain dangers on the world wide web that could be avoided with proper guidance from parental and authority figures in the childs life. Using various methods of research and survey that include the qualitative and quantitative research methods, I came across fact based information and numerical data that supported my thesis that although the internet can act as an all around teacher and baby sitter, it also places the innocence of a child in danger because of the predators and bullies that lurk within the system. Children and young adults are not always equipped to handle such situations which can bring about emotional trauma and moral questions from the young users. Therefore the age bracket of these users require My field work and studies have shown that parents and educators are aware of the problems that exist when young people have internet access. As such, they have come up with ways and means to limit the childs exposure to the internet. Parents have done this by limiting the chillds time on the computer and restricting the browsing habits of the child through the use of specific site blocking software which is loaded into the computer. Some parents though, opt to join their children when they browse the internet instead so that they can visually see and personally restict the access of the child. Such a practice also allowed the parent to talk to the child about why certain websites are offensive. Thankfully, most educators and parents whom approached for my data gathering were quite accomodating and helpful thus making my field work and data collection easier and more accurate. In the end, I discovered that the parents and educators have only limited

Monday, February 10, 2020

Political science Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 words - 1

Political science - Essay Example The U.S. victory can be attributed to their decisive plans for naval control on the western pacific wing during the World War II. This operation was carried out with little knowledge of modern operational ideas. It is for this reason that both sides experienced tactical shortcomings that halted the entire mission and objective of the operation. This paper shall analyze the battle for Leyte Gulf with its main focus on the principles and art of military operation by the U.S. and Japan. In this regard the paper will focus on command decisions by the U.S. and Japanese naval commanders with a view of coming up with modern principles that can be applied in future operations. Principles of operation The success of any warfare mission depends solely on the ability of the commander to identify the aim, decipher the strategic factors of his operation, select and organize his forces and design a plan to achieve the objective of the operation. Normally, the commander’s role involves integ ration and coordination of an operation in a way as to inflict shock, disrupt and defeat the enemy. This is possible when the entire operation injects force on a totally different measure. In so doing, the commander ought to choose the correct course of action as dictated by ground factors by selecting factors pertinent to operations guided by the philosophy of operational art. The planning, synchronization and the conduct of operational functions have some impacts on the belligerents. This paper intends to discuss the aftereffects of the operational functions of the military in relation to planning, synchronization and execution. To achieve this aim, the impacts of the operational functions to belligerents in the Leyte Gulf operation will be discussed. The Leyte Gulf operation, also termed as the battles for Leyte Gulf, was a battle that occurred during the Second World War, from the 23rd to the 25th of October 1944. It aimed at the liberation of Philippines. Allied forces of the U .S.A and Australia and the Imperial Japanese Navy were the protagonists in the battle (Adamsky, 2010). The battle started with the invasion of Leyte’s island by the ground forces of the allied forces led by general Douglas Mac Arthur. The Japanese fleet took up the battle to defeat the invasion, but got defeated by the U.S. seventh fleet led by Vice Admiral Thomas Kinkaid and the fleet led by Admiral William. The battle got divided into four engagements which were the battle of Samar, the battle of cape Engano, the battle of Surigao strait, and the battle of the Sibuyan Sea. Preparation and Planning The main objective of the operation was to capture Leyte Gulf. The U.S. naval forces approached the attack using two axes, one under the leadership of Admiral Nimitz. This was designed to advance its operations towards a westerly strategic axis with the sole purpose of capturing the Marianas, Palau, Gilbert and Marshall Islands. The second set of forces, the southwest pacific forc es, under the command of General Douglas followed a northwesterly tactical axis all the way through Guinea and Morotai. The two axes were expected to intersect at Leyte. According to the leading commanders, the intersection would act as a stepping stone for effective takeover of Philippines. This was a strategic move in the heart of the operation as this was designed to cut off communication of Japanese sea lines disadvantaging their retaliation. In

Thursday, January 30, 2020

Language Investigation Essay Example for Free

Language Investigation Essay How gender affect linguistics in programmes. For this investigation I aim to produce a theory on the language of gender orientation in programming. I think it will be interesting to observe how the role of male and female in our society can affect the programmes that are broadcasted and the linguistics that feature when a programme adheres to a particular gender roles. I will take into account the contextual factors to fully assess whether it is gender, or other factors such as age, class or culture, that affects the language of a programme. The type of programming I am going to study are childrens television programmes because they are commonly reflective of societys stereotypical views of gender. It is important to assess the influence of heavily male or female based language on children, and whether it forms a gender identity within them and affects how they linguistically interact with those around them. My hypothesis is that language will be heavily male orientated, following from the stereotypical role males have to assert dominance in society. I have chosen to study the childrens cartoon X-Men because it has an interesting reflection of gender portrayed through language. I am going to begin by analysing the title of the programme I am going to study X-Men. This title introduces the influence of male superiority through the language it uses, instantaneously using the word men to portray the themes of the programme. Instead of the programme only containing men as the title suggests, there is actually an equal number of men as there is women in the X-Men, so we can conclude that they play a dominant role in the programming, and the influence of stereotypical gender views have responsibility for this. It should also be considered that the women in this programme are represented through male characteristics, and by conforming to this and seen as part of the X-Men, they are not inferior, but instead seen as equal through another gender. The title clearly suggests that the programme is male orientated, and degrades the influence of the female gender in association with the themes of power and battle. Looking into the idea that the female characters in the X-Men are represented with male traits, I am going to study the language of the names used for each character. Without knowing the gender beforehand, it is difficult to associate any of the names with an influence of the female gender. Nearly every name is associates with male traits. For instance when looking at the name Wolverine we can clearly determine that the wolf is a origin for power, teamwork and male dominance, which is appropriate to the male character. In comparison to Rogue, a name which has no female influence, and disassociates the gender from the character, giving her a power orientated name, but suggests that the male represents power. This transcript is of a mostly male conversation, and reveals how the programme orientates towards this gender through its language. The use of M1-4 represents the 4 different male characters in this scene, and F1 represents the only female character. M2/3 are very aggressive, using phrases such as Lets crush him and I think me and my buds are gonna squash this slimeball. This associates the male figure as one of violence. This is disconcerting that this view could influence young children, because they will associate power and dominance with aggression, which could have all sorts of implications of their behaviour. Other male characteristics in the language of this scene are using last names for refer to each other, and imperatives to dominate the conversation and assert their authority. This fits in with George Keith and Jon Shuttleworths theory, found in Living Language, that men are competitive in conversation, as opposed to women, who are more supportive. The role of the female in this transcript is very brief, but she clearly supports the other character of Scott, rather than tries to compete with him. This transcript show how female characters are represented as weaker than male. It is interesting to consider that F1 is a dominating powerful character, with many male traits, when the programme deals with the super heros and battle scenes. In comparison, in this scene, she is represented as the supporting character, and inferior to the males. This suggests that the programme still has connotations of the weakness of the female gender. For instance when F1 says Oh, you poor baby! her language suggests she is being supportive. The use of the word baby has maternal connotations, which is representative of stereotypical domestic and mothering views of females. The language associated with this programme portrays how the male gender dominates the linguistics of X-Men which gives an insight into the general view of gender orientation of the programme. These two examples are more substantial in that they are repeated with every episode that a young child watches. It is important to analyse how a heavily male orientated programme effects children. We should consider that a childs perception of the reality of a television programme is somewhat unclear, and its influence could change their gender associated behaviour and understandings. When watching X-Men a young child receives language that has strong connotations of male dominance and power, which leads young children to gender roles themselves, which society have been trying to break for some time now.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Zelda Fitzgerald and the French Aviator Essay -- Fitzgerald Biography

Zelda Fitzgerald and the French Aviator In an attempt to improve their deteriorating marriage, F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald made the decision in 1924 to relocate to Europe. Soon after their arrival in the French Riviera, Scott began working feverishly on what would be The Great Gatsby, leaving him little time for family bonding. Servants tended to their only daughter, Scottie, and Zelda, with few other responsibilities, spent her days sunbathing, swimming, and playing tennis. At least this was the case up until she became acquainted with a young French aviator. A local casino owner introduced the couple to a group of French naval officers that were stationed in nearby Frà ©jus. This was the first contact the Fitzgeralds had with foreigners of their own age and Scott finally felt as if he belonged in France. The officer both Scott and Zelda, more importantly, liked most was Edouard Jozan, a lieutenant and son of a middle-class family in Nimes. Nancy Milford describes Jozan by saying, There was an air of assurance about him, a quality of natural leadership that Zelda respected and responded to. Leadership, athletic prowess, a smart military air were precisely those qualities Scott Fitzgerald lacked. It was as if Jozan and Fitzgerald were opposite sides of a coin, each admiring each other’s abilities, gifts, talents, but the difference in the equipment they brought to bear in life was clear.[1] Soon after their introduction, Zelda and Edouard began spending more and more time together and it is most likely the allure of Edouard’s foreign characteristics which attracted her most, seeing that he was clearly the complete opposite of Scott. At the beginning, Scott did not appear threatened by, what he... ...r be repaired.†[7] Works Cited Graham, Sheilah. The Real F. Scott Fitzgerald; New York: Grosset and Dunlap, Inc, 1976 Milford, Nancy. Zelda: A Biography; New York: Harper and Row, 1970. Stavola, Thomas J. Scott Fitzgerald: Crisis in an American Identity; New York: Harper and Row, 1979. http://www.zeldafitzgerald.com/fitzgeralds/index_ie5.asp http://www.pbs.org/kteh/amstorytellers/bios.html [1] Milford, Nancy. Zelda: A Biography; New York: Harper and Row, 1970. p 109 [2] Graham, Sheilah. The Real F. Scott Fitzgerald; New York: Grosset and Dunlap, Inc, 1976. p 61 [3] ibid, p 61 [4] http://www.zeldafitzgerald.com/fitzgeralds/index_ie5.asp [5] Stavola, Thomas J. Scott Fitzgerald: Crisis in an American Identity; New York: Harper and Row, 1979. p 57 [6] Stavola, p 57 [7] http://www.zeldafitzgerald.com/fitzgeralds/index_ie5.asp Zelda Fitzgerald and the French Aviator Essay -- Fitzgerald Biography Zelda Fitzgerald and the French Aviator In an attempt to improve their deteriorating marriage, F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald made the decision in 1924 to relocate to Europe. Soon after their arrival in the French Riviera, Scott began working feverishly on what would be The Great Gatsby, leaving him little time for family bonding. Servants tended to their only daughter, Scottie, and Zelda, with few other responsibilities, spent her days sunbathing, swimming, and playing tennis. At least this was the case up until she became acquainted with a young French aviator. A local casino owner introduced the couple to a group of French naval officers that were stationed in nearby Frà ©jus. This was the first contact the Fitzgeralds had with foreigners of their own age and Scott finally felt as if he belonged in France. The officer both Scott and Zelda, more importantly, liked most was Edouard Jozan, a lieutenant and son of a middle-class family in Nimes. Nancy Milford describes Jozan by saying, There was an air of assurance about him, a quality of natural leadership that Zelda respected and responded to. Leadership, athletic prowess, a smart military air were precisely those qualities Scott Fitzgerald lacked. It was as if Jozan and Fitzgerald were opposite sides of a coin, each admiring each other’s abilities, gifts, talents, but the difference in the equipment they brought to bear in life was clear.[1] Soon after their introduction, Zelda and Edouard began spending more and more time together and it is most likely the allure of Edouard’s foreign characteristics which attracted her most, seeing that he was clearly the complete opposite of Scott. At the beginning, Scott did not appear threatened by, what he... ...r be repaired.†[7] Works Cited Graham, Sheilah. The Real F. Scott Fitzgerald; New York: Grosset and Dunlap, Inc, 1976 Milford, Nancy. Zelda: A Biography; New York: Harper and Row, 1970. Stavola, Thomas J. Scott Fitzgerald: Crisis in an American Identity; New York: Harper and Row, 1979. http://www.zeldafitzgerald.com/fitzgeralds/index_ie5.asp http://www.pbs.org/kteh/amstorytellers/bios.html [1] Milford, Nancy. Zelda: A Biography; New York: Harper and Row, 1970. p 109 [2] Graham, Sheilah. The Real F. Scott Fitzgerald; New York: Grosset and Dunlap, Inc, 1976. p 61 [3] ibid, p 61 [4] http://www.zeldafitzgerald.com/fitzgeralds/index_ie5.asp [5] Stavola, Thomas J. Scott Fitzgerald: Crisis in an American Identity; New York: Harper and Row, 1979. p 57 [6] Stavola, p 57 [7] http://www.zeldafitzgerald.com/fitzgeralds/index_ie5.asp

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Skoog Solution of Chapter 15

Crouch Principles of Instrumental Analysis, 6th ed. Chapter 15 Instructor’s Manual CHAPTER 15 15-1. In a fluorescence emission spectrum, the excitation wavelength is held constant and the emission intensity is measured as a function of the emission wavelength. In an excitation spectrum, the emission is measured at one wavelength while the excitation wavelengths are scanned. The excitation spectrum closely resembles an absorption spectrum since the emission intensity is usually proportional to the absorbance of the molecule. 15-2. a) Fluorescence is the process in which a molecule, excited by the absorption of radiation, emits a photon while undergoing a transition from an excited singlet electronic state to a lower state of the same spin multiplicity (e. g. , a singlet > singlet transition).Phosphorescence is the process in which a molecule, excited by the absorption of radiation, emits a photon while undergoing a transition from an excited triplet state to a lower state of a different spin multiplicity (e. g. , a triplet > singlet transition). (c) Resonance fluorescence is observed when an excited species emits radiation of he same frequency at used to cause the excitation. (d) A singlet state is one in which the spins of the electrons of an atom or molecule are all paired so there is no net spin angular momentum (e) A triplet state is one in which the spins of the electrons of an atom or molecule are unpaired so that their spin angular moments add to give a net non-zero moment. (f) Vibrational relaxation is the process by which a molecule loses its excess vibrational energy without emitting radiation. 1 Principles of Instrumental Analysis, 6th ed. (g) Chapter 15Internal conversion is the intermolecular process in which a molecule crosses to a lower electronic state with emitting radiation. (h) External conversion is a radiationless process in which a molecule loses electronic energy while transferring that energy to the solvent or another solute. (i) I ntersystem crossing is the process in which a molecule in one spin state changes to another spin state with nearly the same total energy (e. g. , singlet > triplet). (j) Predissociation occurs when a molecule changes from a higher electronic state to n upper vibrational level of a lower electronic state in which the vibrational energy is great enough to rupture the bond. (k) Dissociation occurs when radiation promotes a molecule directly to a state with sufficient vibrational energy for a bond to break. (l) Quantum yield is the fraction of excited molecules undergoing the process of interest. For example, the quantum yield of fluorescence is the fraction of molecules which have absorbed radiation that fluoresce.Chemiluminescence is a process by which radiation is produced as a result of a chemical reaction. 5-3. For spectrofluorometry, the analytical signal F is proportional to the source intensity P0 and the transducer sensitivity. In spectrophotometry, the absorbance A is proporti onal to the ratio of P0 to P. Increasing P0 or the transducer sensitivity to P0 produces a corresponding increase in P or the sensitivity to P. Thus the ratio does not change. As a result, the sensitivity of fluorescence can be increased by increasing P0 or transducer sensitivity, but the that of absorbance does not change. 2 Principles of Instrumental Analysis, 6th ed. Chapter 15 5-4. (a) Fluorescein because of its greater structural rigidity due to the bridging –O– groups. (b) o,o’-Dihdroxyazobenzene because the –N=N– group provides rigidity that is absent in the –NH–NH– group. 15-5. Compounds that fluoresce have structures that slow the rate of nonradiative relaxation to the point where there is time for fluorescence to occur. Compounds that do not fluoresce have structures that permit rapid relaxation by nonradiative processes. 15-6. The triplet state has a long lifetime and is very susceptible to collisional deactivation.T hus, most phosphorescence measurements are made at low temperature in a rigid matrix or in solutions containing micelles or cyclodextrin molecules. Also, electronic methods must be used to discriminate phosphorescence from fluorescence. Not as many molecules give good phosphorescence signals as fluorescence signals. As a result, the experimental requirements to measure phosphorescence are more difficult than those to measure fluorescence and the applications are not as large.3 Principles of Instrumental Analysis, 6th ed. 15-7. Chapter 15 4 Principles of Instrumental Analysis, 6th ed. 5-8. Chapter 15 15-9. Q = quinine ppm Q in diluted sample = 100 ppm ? 245 = 196 125 mass Q = 196 mg Q 500 mL ? 100 mL ? = 490 mg Q 10 mL solution 20 mL 3 5 Principles of Instrumental Analysis, 6th ed. 15-10. cQ = A1csVs (448)(50 ppm)(10. 0 mL) = = 145. 45 ppm ( A2 ? A1 )VQ ( 525 ? 448) (20. 0 mL) Chapter 15 145. 45 ppm ? 1 mg quinine 1 g solution ? ? 1000 mL = 145. 45 mg quinine 3 1 mL 1 ? 10 g solution 0. 225 g Q ? 100% = 3. 43% 4. 236 g tablet 15-11. Assume that the luminescent intensity L is proportional to cx, the concentration of iron in the original sample.Then, L1 = kcxVx / Vt where Vx and Vt are the volume of sample and of the final solution, and k is a proportionality constant. For the solution after addition of Vs mL of a standard of concentration cs, the luminescence L2 is L2 = kcxVx / Vt + kcsVs / Vt Dividing the second equation by the first yields, after rearrangement, cx = L1csVs (14. 3)(3. 58 ? 10? 5 )(1. 00) = = 1. 35 ? 10? 5 M ( L2 ? L1 )Vx (33. 3 ? 14. 3)(2. 00) 15-12. Assume that the luminescence intensity L is proportional to the partial pressure of S* . 2 We may then write L = k[S* ] 2 and K = S* ][H 2 O]4 2 [SO 2 ]2 [H 2 ]4 where the bracketed terms are all partial pressures and k and K are constants.The two equations can be combined to give after rearrangement 6 Principles of Instrumental Analysis, 6th ed. Chapter 15 [SO 2 ] = [H 2 O]2 [H 2 ]2 L kK In a hydr ogen-rich flame, the pressure of H2O and H2 should be more or less constant. Thus, [SO 2 ] = k ? L where k? = 1 kK 15-13. The fluorescent center is the rigid quinoline ring, which is rich in ? electrons. 15-14. From Equation 15-7, we can write F = 2. 303 ? f K bcP0 = 2. 303 ? K cP0 ? 0 Dividing both sides by the lifetime ? yields F = 2. 303K bcP0 ? ?0 Since K? , ? , b, ? 0 and P0 are constants, we can write F ? = Kc where K is a compilation of all the constants in the previous equation. 7 Principles of Instrumental Analysis, 6th ed. 15-15. (a) Chapter 15 (b) (c) The corrected fluorescence Fcorr would be Fcorr = F? 0/? , where F is the observed fluorescence, ? 0 is the lifetime for [Cl–] = 0. 00, and ? is the observed lifetime. The results are in the spreadsheet. 8 Principles of Instrumental Analysis, 6th ed. Chapter 15 9

Monday, January 6, 2020

Answers to the Questions on the Movie Children of Men

Answers to the Questions on the Movie Children of Men Anthropology Response to Question 1 The characterization of the world from the commentators’ point of view as depicted by Children of men can be approached basing on two co-joined themes: Faith and hope. The commentators characterize the world as a place that is doomed; where hope and faith for desperate ones is dwindling in way or another. In their views, the commentators bring out the picture of the world as an empty nest. All the commentators depict a nightmarish future. Children of men gives an overview of how the post-modern world’s future is very uncertain. Many years (18) characterized by infertility places the society on the verge of extinction. Yet the world loses the world youngest man. On the other hand, illegal immigrants try to move into England anticipating the best, but the government quickly comes up with laws on immigration which target to oppress the immigrants. The commentators cite these in their view the world as a place where hope for the desperate ones would persistently dwindle, ju st as the refugees hope is dwindled before immigration laws as well as the world youngest man dying amidst the world infertility and ageing population. Response to Question 2 The response of this question is based on the themes of faith and hope. Indeed, the dwindling of faith and hope is evident in the world’s current occurrences. A turn of event that may be considered to be in line with this include riots (such as those evidenced UK), earthquake incidents (such as the recent Turkey havoc), economic crisis (such as those that have rocked Greece), harsh immigration laws (such as those being applied by United States) and widespread protests (such as those being evidenced in Africa). Hereunder, a special reference is given to recent earthquakes in Turkey. A strong earthquake recently struck Turkey, causing human deaths. At least over 1352 were feared dead as reported by BBC. Arguably, the death toll was so big that the state hospital lacked a space to ‘put the bodies’. This kind of calamity is disastrous as it wipes out a big population. The concerned parties are left to live on dwindling hope as the days go by and as rescue missions are carried out on the rubbles. But perhaps others have faith that the coming generation would have to device a way in which this could be sorted out. But how else could the coming generation achieve such expectations when the earthquake is threatens to wipe out the current generation; that would bear future generation? These are the kinds of nightmarish future dystopia as depicted by P.D James in Children of men. According to him, the number of children has reduced, having been 19 years since the last child was born. Yet the youngest person who would deliver the world from infertility is lat er killed. There is a connection between the two cases; in both, the generations are being wiped out through catastrophic deaths. Response to Question 3 There is a way in which anthropologists could help us understand and solve issues such as political tensions, conflicts as well as other world emergent crises. Concepts such as inequality, globalization, ethnic nationalism and stratification are areas through which the role of anthropology could be felt. Anthropologists could come up with theories and as well as methods in which the future problems could be solved. Anthropologist could organize seminars to discuss experiences in the contemporary world that are full of uncertainty. It is possible for anthropologists to come up with models that are teleological to changes (Miller 241). More so, they could come up with approaches to ascertain the rapture figures as well as future risks. For instance, through ethnography, anthropologists could examine various responses from human to establish political, personal as well as solutions that are practical to contemporary issues that place human lives under risks. In so doing, the scientists could to choose on subjects such as thoughts on rapture and futures that are uncertain, risk projection, risk speculations, return of the dwindling hopes, urban form experimentations and earthquake future calculations. Works cited Miller, Babara. Cultural Anthropology. Boston: Pearson Education Inc., 2007, Print.